Galaktoboureko


Galaktoboureko.JPG

Η συνταγή και στα ελληνικά στο τέλος της ανάρτησης!

As I have mentioned in a previous post after the loss of war from Turkey in 1922, Greece had to accept about 1,500,000 Greek refugees from Asia Minor who had to abandon their homes and land and come here.

Greece at that time was completely broke after the war and people here were exhausted and devastated. Most of the families had lost male children in that war and their economic situation was miserable. When all these refugees came here, the locals were very hostile and suspicious towards them. The truth is, that no one can blame them for this behavior. You cannot ask from a person to be tolerant when this means that he will have to share his, anyway, limited food. People were afraid that the newly comers would steel their jobs and eventually drove them to an even deeper poverty. Things were so tensed in the beginning that they used the refugees as a threat for their children to eat or behave. My mother told me that her father changed his last name, so as for him and his family to avoid all this harassment.

Galaktoboureko.JPG

Nevertheless, as the years passed by, slowly but steadily, these new inhabitants started creating roots here. Locals begun to accept and even create bonds with them, either by becoming friends with them or by marriage.

These newcomers although poor, having to leave their homes with only the clothes they were wearing, they brought so many other things with them. They brought their customs, their values and of course their food.

Their dishes came to “graft” the local kitchen and increased the number of choices anyone had.

Galaktoboureko is one such sweet. It came along with the Greek refugees from Asia Minor and thus has a great influence from the Middle Eastern sweets. It consists of phyllo sheets and in the middle a custard made from fine semolina. It is baked in the oven and it is then bathed in a thick syrup.

Galaktoboureko.JPG

The most famous Galaktoboureko in Athens is sold downtown and it’s the one from ‘Kosmikon’. ‘Kosmikon’ is a pastry shop that has become very well known for its secret recipe for Galaktoboureko. Truly, I think is one of the best if not the best Galaktoboureko I have ever tried. People travel from different parts of Athens to go and buy it from one of the three stores this pastry shop owns.

I decided to make a Galaktoboureko this weekend, because I suddenly had an urge for something sweet and creamy. I found several recipes and after reading and testing, I finalized it and made it. It was so delicious. I decided to change a little things and I didn’t make it overly sweet, plus I made the cream smoother than the usual one. For this reason instead of using only semolina, I used a combination of fine semolina and corn starch. The result was a not overly sweet dessert with a very smooth cream in which semolina doesn’t show almost at all. I made double the dose for the cream because my husband loves it this way! It is very easy and if you decide to make it, you will love it!

  Galaktoboureko.JPG

Galaktoboureko

 

Ingredients

For the Cream

800 ml / 27 fl oz. fresh milk

100 gr. / 3.5 oz. sugar

2 eggs

50 gr. / 1.7 oz. fine semolina

30 gr. / 1 oz. corn starch

1 tsp vanilla extract

40 gr. / 1.4 oz. real butter

  Galaktoboureko.JPG

For the Syrup

500gr. / 17.5 oz. sugar

300 gr. / 10.5 oz.water

20 gr. / 1 tbsp glucose

 

½ kilo / 1 package of phyllo

250 gr. / 8.8 oz. real butter, melted

  Galaktoboureko.JPG

 

Instructions

First we make the syrup.

We pour the cold syrup to the Galaktoboureko the minute it comes out of the oven.

 

For the Syrup

In a pot we boil the syrup in high heat ingredients for 5 minutes from the moment it starts to boil.

Remove from fire and let it cool.

Galaktoboureko.JPG  

For the Cream

In a pot pour the 700ml / 23.6 fl oz. of milk and 50 gr. / 1.7 oz. of sugar and put it in medium heat.

Take a bowl and add the rest of the sugar the eggs, the rest of the milk, the semolina, the corn starch and the vanilla extract.

Whisk to incorporate.

When the milk starts to get hot, take couple of spoonfuls of it and pour it to the bowl with the rest of the ingredients and whisk.

In this way you bring both batters at the same temperature.

Remove the pot from fire and pour the egg/semolina batter to it whisking continuously.

Bring back to fire, add the butter and continue to whisk until it thickens.

Galaktoboureko.JPG

Remove from fire and put aside.

Take a rectangular pan with dimensions 34cm X 25cm / 13 in. X 10 in.

Butter it really well and start to pile the phyllo sheets and follows.

Take a phyllo sheet and lay it in the pan.

Butter it very well.

Put another phyllo sheet over the first.

Butter it as well.

Continue like this until you have laid half of the phyllo sheets or half plus one if the number of phyllos is odd.

Throw the cream and spread it to cover all the surface of the phyllo.

Galaktoboureko.JPG

 

On top of it follow the same procedure as before putting the rest of phyllo sheets one by one buttering each one of them.

Cut the top phyllo sheets in diamonds or squares.

Be careful with the knife to not let the cream flow and also not to cut the bottom layers of phyllo.

Preheat oven to 160° C / 320° F.

Place the pan in the oven and bake for 50 to 55 minutes depending on the oven or until the phyllo has taken a deep golden color.

Immediately after you take the sweet out of the oven, you pour the cooled syrup on top of it.

Let it absorb as much syrup as possible and cool down.

Cut and serve!

Galaktoboureko.JPG

5.0 from 9 reviews
Galaktoboureko
 
Author/ Συγγραφέας:
Recipe type/ Τύπος Πιάτου: Dessert
Cuisine/ Κουζίνα: Greek
Ingredients/ Συστατικά
For the Cream
  • 800 ml / 27 fl oz. fresh milk
  • 100 gr. / 3.5 oz. sugar
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 50 gr. / 1.7 oz. fine semolina
  • 30 gr. / 1 oz. corn starch
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 40 gr. / 1.4 oz. real butter
For the Syrup
  • 500gr. / 17.5 oz. sugar
  • 300 gr. / 10.5 oz.water
  • 20 gr. / 1 tbsp glucose
For the Phyllo
  • ½ kilo / 1 package of phyllo
  • 250 gr. / 8.8 oz. real butter, melted
Instructions/ Εκτέλεση
  1. First we make the syrup.
  2. We pour the cold syrup to the Galaktoboureko the minute it comes out of the oven.
For the Syrup
  1. In a pot we boil the syrup in high heat ingredients for 5 minutes from the moment it starts to boil.
  2. Remove from fire and let it cool.
For the Cream
  1. In a pot pour the 700ml / 23.6 fl oz. of milk and 50 gr. / 1.7 oz. of sugar and put it in medium heat.
  2. Take a bowl and add the rest of the sugar the eggs, the rest of the milk, the semolina, the corn starch and the vanilla extract.
  3. Whisk to incorporate.
  4. When the milk starts to get hot, take couple of spoonfuls of it and pour it to the bowl with the rest of the ingredients and whisk.
  5. In this way you bring both batters at the same temperature.
  6. Remove the pot from fire and pour the egg/semolina batter to it whisking continuously.
  7. Bring back to fire, add the butter and continue to whisk until it thickens.
  8. Remove from fire and put aside.
  9. Take a rectangular pan with dimensions 34cm X 25cm / 13 in. X 10 in.
  10. Butter it really well and start to pile the phyllo sheets and follows.
  11. Take a phyllo sheet and lay it in the pan.
  12. Butter it very well.
  13. Put another phyllo sheet over the first.
  14. Butter it as well.
  15. Continue like this until you have laid half of the phyllo sheets or half plus one if the number of phyllos is odd.
  16. Throw the cream and spread it to cover all the surface of the phyllo.
  17. On top of it follow the same procedure as before putting the rest of phyllo sheets one by one buttering each one of them.
  18. Cut the top phyllo sheets in diamonds or squares.
  19. Be careful with the knife to not let the cream flow and also not to cut the bottom layers of phyllo.
  20. Preheat oven to 160° C / 320° F.
  21. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 50 to 55 minutes depending on the oven or until the phyllo has taken a deep golden color.
  22. Immediately after you take the sweet out of the oven, you pour the cooled syrup on top of it.
  23. Let it absorb as much syrup as possible and cool down.
  24. Cut and serve!
Notes/ Σημειώσεις
Recipe adapted from several sources including Mirsini Lambraki and Stelios Parliaros

5.0 from 9 reviews
Γαλακτομπούρεκο
 
Author/ Συγγραφέας:
Recipe type/ Τύπος Πιάτου: Γλυκό
Cuisine/ Κουζίνα: Ελληνική
Ingredients/ Συστατικά
Για την Κρέμα
  • 800 ml φρέσκο γάλα
  • 100 γρ. ζάχαρη
  • 2 αυγά
  • 50 γρ. σιμιγδάλι ψιλό
  • 30 γρ. Κορν φλάουρ
  • 1 κ.γ. εκχύλισμα βανίλιας, ή μία βανιλλίνη
  • 40 γρ. βούτυρο
Για το Σιρόπι
  • 500 γρ. ζάχαρη
  • 300 γρ. νερό
  • 20 γρ. γλυκόζη
  • ½ κιλό φύλλο
  • 250 γρ. βούτυρο, λιωμένο
Instructions/ Εκτέλεση
  1. Πρώτα κάνουμε το σιρόπι.
  2. Ρίχνουμε το κρύο σιρόπι στο γαλακτομπούρεκο, την στιγμή που βγαίνει από το φούρνο.
Για το Σιρόπι
  1. Σε μια κατσαρόλα βράζουμε το σιρόπι σε υψηλή θερμοκρασία για 5 λεπτά από τη στιγμή που φτάνει στο σημείο βρασμού.
  2. Βγάζουμε από τη φωτιά και αφήνουμε να κρυώσει.
Για την Κρέμα
  1. Σε μια κατσαρόλα ρίχνουμε το 700ml γάλα και 50 γρ. ζάχαρη και βάζουμε σε μέτρια φωτιά.
  2. Παίρνουμε ένα μπολ και προσθέτουμε την υπόλοιπη ζάχαρη, τα αυγά, το υπόλοιπο γάλα, το σιμιγδάλι, το κορν φλάουερ και το εκχύλισμα βανίλιας ή τη βανιλλίνη.
  3. Ανακατεύουμε να ενσωματωθούν.
  4. Όταν το γάλα αρχίζει να ζεσταίνεται, παίρνουμε μερικές κουταλιές από αυτό και τις ρίχνουμε στο μπολ με τα υπόλοιπα συστατικά και ανακατεύουμε.
  5. Με αυτόν τον τρόπο φέρνουμε το μίγμα στο μπολ στην ίδια θερμοκρασία με το γάλα.
  6. Βγάζουμε την κατσαρόλα από τη φωτιά και ρίχνουμε το μίγμα αυγού/σιμιγδαλιού ανακατεύοντας συνεχώς.
  7. Βάζουμε πίσω στη φωτιά, προσθέτουμε το βούτυρο και να συνεχίζουμε να ανακατεύουμε μέχρι να πήξει.
  8. Βγάζουμε από τη φωτιά και το βάζουμε στην άκρη.
  9. Παίρνουμε ένα ορθογώνιο ταψί με διαστάσεις 34cmX25cm.
  10. Το βουτυρώνουμε πολύ καλά.
  11. Παίρνουμε ένα φύλλο και το απλώνουμε στο ταψί.
  12. Βουτυρώνουμε πολύ καλά.
  13. Βάζουμε ένα άλλο φύλλο πάνω από το πρώτο.
  14. Βουτυρώνουμε επίσης.
  15. Συνεχίζουμε έτσι έως ότου χρησιμοποιήσουμε τα μισά από τα φύλλα κρούστας, ή τα μισά συν ένα αν ο αριθμός των φύλλων είναι μονός.
  16. Ρίχνουμε την κρέμα και απλώνουμε να καλύψει όλη την επιφάνεια του ταψιού.
  17. Πάνω από την κρέμα ακολουθούμε την ίδια διαδικασία όπως και πριν βάζοντας τα υπόλοιπα φύλλα κρούστας το ένα πάνω στο άλλο και αλείφοντας κάθε φορά με βούτυρο.
  18. Κόβουμε τα φύλλα σε τετράγωνα κομμάτια προσέχοντας να μην ξεχειλίσει η κρέμα.
  19. Προθερμαίνουμε το φούρνο στους 160° C.
  20. Τοποθετούμε το ταψί στο φούρνο και ψήνουμε για 50 έως 55 λεπτά, ανάλογα με το φούρνο, ή έως ότου τα φύλλα πάρουν ένα ροδοκόκκινο χρώμα.
  21. Βγάζουμε το γλυκό από το φούρνο,και αμέσως το περιχύνουμε με το δροσερό σιρόπι από πάνω.
  22. Αφήνουμε να απορροφήσει όσο το δυνατόν περισσότερο σιρόπι και να κρυώσει.
  23. Κόβουμε και σερβίρουμε!
Notes/ Σημειώσεις
Συνταγή προσαρμογή από διάφορες πηγές μεταξύ αυτών από τη Μυρσίνη Λαμπράκη και το Στέλιο Παρλιάρο

52 Responses to Galaktoboureko

    1
  1. sherly says:

    love this recipe 😉

  2. 2
  3. Susan Lester says:

    My mother was just talking about when we had this in Greece! I think I’ll make it for her on Mother’s Day! Thank you for the inspiration & interesting historical context!

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  5. mila furman says:

    Karina!!! Thank you for linking me back here!! This is soooo being made!!!

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  7. Miz Helen says:

    Congratulations!
    Your recipe is featured on Full Plate Thursday this week. Hope you have a great weekend and enjoy your new Red Plate.
    Miz Helen

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  9. Lisa says:

    This looks delicious! I liked the history lesson, as well! :-) Thanks for linking up with “Try a New Recipe Tuesday.” I hope you will be able to join us again this week. http://our4kiddos.blogspot.com/2013/11/try-new-recipe-tuesday-november-5.html Also, I would like to ask for your support. In this week’s post, I mention that I was nominated for 2 awards in the homeschool moms blog contest. I would really appreciate your votes. The links are in the post. THANKS! :-)

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  11. Miz Helen says:

    Hi Katerina,
    No matter how many material things we may loose along the way, we always have our food and our culture that we can share with others. When I make this fabulous dessert I will think of the story of how it came to you and then to me. Thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday and hope you have a great weekend!
    Come Back Soon,
    Miz Helen

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  13. This looks creamy and divine! Thanks so much for linking to Less Laundry, More Linking Party!

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  15. Mary Ellen says:

    This looks amazing, thanks for sharing at Talking Tuesday.

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  17. This looks delicious!! Found you at Tasty Tuesdays!

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  19. This looks incredible. Thanks for sharing at the weekend re-Treat link party!

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  21. Renee says:

    Sounds wonderful I loved the history lesson, too. Will be checking out other recipes from you, too!

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  23. This just looks absolutely delicious!!!

  24. 13
  25. a quiet life says:

    this looks so decadently delicious!

  26. 14
  27. Amy Tong says:

    This is such a tender and delicate dessert. Love it.

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  29. Xara says:

    Katerina,this is my all time favourite dessert!!! Your recipe is really good and it looks absolutely delicious!!! YUMMMMM!! Have a great weekend!

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  31. Monet says:

    Not only did I learn of a new dessert, but I learned the history behind it. What a delightful post! This looks so delicious. Thank you for sharing!

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  33. That looks amazing! Very clever! It looks so delicious – makes me want to reach out and take one out of my computer! 😉

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  35. Liz says:

    What a lovely dessert…with an interesting history! I love that you doubled the custard…it must taste divine!

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  37. rosita says:

    Se ve perfecto una verdadera delicia de postre,saludos y abrazos amiga.

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  39. Nadji says:

    Une baklawa à la crème. Je suis sure que c’est délicieux.
    A essayer très vite.
    A bientôt

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  41. Simply divine! Best of both world, crusty and soft in a single plate…

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  43. Sissi says:

    Dear Katerina, thank you once more for a history lesson which inevitably ends up with a recipe… This dessert looks so good, I am tempted to prepare it this weekend. I love custards in any form and I have had phyllo pastry in my fridge for some time in case I want to experiment with it, so thank you so much for inspiration.

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  45. Emily says:

    These look so good! Please don’t be insulted by the recipe I just posted of “Greek” marinated chicken, it does not hold a candle to the amazing REAL Greek recipes you post! :)

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  47. Claire says:

    This looks so rich and creamy! I really want to try my hand at this recipe. Delicious. I always enjoy hearing the history as well.

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  49. gloria says:

    Katerina I love this look absolutely delicious!

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  51. Juliana says:

    I do remember having this dessert when dining at the local Greek restaurant…the creamy filling with the slightly crunchy phyllo…
    I can see all the textures in your dessert…I do not dare to “type it” 😀
    Katerina, thank you so much for the caring words, they really mean a lot to me. All this had been an experience that I never thought I would have, it is all good…
    Hope you are having a great week and I so wish I could have a taste of your dessert.

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  53. Americans have a rich and deep immigrant history. All our families have been immigrants at one time. We are a Heinz 57 variety (smile).

    This Greek sweet look divine.

    Velva

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  55. Beth says:

    What a sad story. That must have been such a difficult time for the Greek people. This dessert is a lovely silver lining.

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  57. Barbara says:

    We’ve had somewhat the same experience in South Florida what with the Cuban influx. Miami now is mostly Cuban.
    This dessert looks wonderful, Katerina. Love the custard aspect and the semolina gives it body.

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  59. cquek says:

    It is so exciting to learn about new cuisines, ingredients

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  61. Asmita says:

    Another gorgeous dish from you! Looks spectacular!

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  63. Looks like a delicious dessert!

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  65. Oh boy… Captcha didn’t work and erased my comment… Thank you for sharing the story! I would love to try Galaktoboureko from one of the stores. It must be very good and special. I love the flakey top and creamy soft texture inside. Looks delicious, Katerina!

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  67. This is one good looking dessert!

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  69. This looks divine, esp. that flaky layers of filo pastry.

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  71. The dessert looks very tempting and it is a beautiful amalgamation of two great cultures. The contrasting textures must be amazing…the crisp phyllo and the creamy bottom. Yum!

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  73. War as you have so poetically captured bring outs both the worst and best in people. Beautifully written. I can’t stop taking my eyes off this decadent dessert. If there were more stars I would have given you a ten on this post. Creamy and crunchy and delicately sweet. You made my day now if we only lived a tad bit closer… I guess I will have to try this one with your helpful recipe. Have a super week. BAM

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  75. mjskit says:

    War is far reaching, isn’t it? I remember when the refugees from Viet Nam came to America in small boats. In the big cities they were able to emigrate relatively easier, but the smaller communities had a hard time adjusting and being accepted. Your story sounds like things were A LOT worse for everyone, but then in the end, we end up with wonderful new foods. :) This dessert has me wanting to grab a fork and start eating. The cream, the phyllo, the syrup – all looks wonderful!

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  77. As ugly as things can get in the moment it is nice to realize human nature will eventually accept and welcome a different people. I have had this dessert, homemade by people from Asia Minor…it is amazing.

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  79. Love your stories and history. My boys love to read it too.
    Now to the dessert, loving the combination of semolina, milk and phyllo, yum.

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  81. Marion says:

    Κατ’ αρχήν μ αρέσει η ιστορική αναδρομή σε κάθε ανάρτησή σου, με την ιστορία που κρύβει κάποιο γλυκό ή φαγητό :)

    Τώρα το γαλακτομπούρεκο σου φαίνεται τέλειο. Η κρέμα του φανταστική. Αγαπημένο γλυκό του γιού μου

    Γεια στα χέρια σου Κατερίνα μου

    Φιλιά πολλά

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  83. What a beautiful dessert, I love creamy sweets, this I have to try. I wish I were in Greece so I can visit the bakery that makes it. Beautifully done.

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  85. mia maria says:

    You made my favorite dessert Katerina! Delicious!

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  87. pepi says:

    H krema sou fainetai exairetiki!!!

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  89. Υπέροχο γλυκό!
    Παρόλο που δεν μου αρέσουν πολύ τα σιροπιαστά γλυκάκι, όποτε βρίσκω γαλακτομπούρεκο που να έχει πλούσια κρέμα και να μου γαργαλά τη μύτη το άρωμα του, του δίνω και καταλαβαίνει!
    Φιλιά πολλά και καλημέρα Κατερίνα!

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  91. Ola says:

    another very interesting story!\I must remember this name of the shop!

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  93. Louise says:

    That’s it Katerina, can I move in with you? If not, can we be neighbors, lol…What an incredible phyllo dessert you have created. I’m terrible when it comes to working with phyllo. Oh how I wish I had your patience:)

    Thank you so much for the back story of this recipe. Thank you so much for sharing…

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  95. grace says:

    LOVE that crispy top. this is an outstanding treat, katerina!

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  97. love the use of semolina in desserts — this looks so so yummy, Katerina. Look at that divine custard 😀

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  99. Kate says:

    It’s interesting how the refugee situation sounds similar from country to country.

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  101. Looks irresisteable delicious….
    i guess it’s quite pricey sweet bites, more that 20 minutes on treatmill for a singel piece, hehehe
    i guess it’s all worthed!

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  103. Lila says:

    Το αγαπημένο μου γλυκό, το φτιάχνω πάντα του Αγίου Δημητρίου!!!!!!!

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