Copenhagen


Copenhagen.JPG

No, this is not going to be a trip to Denmark or a review to its capital. So, I assume that your next question would be how on earth Copenhagen is related to Greece?

Copenhagen is a Greek sweet similar to Baklava with phylo and almonds. But before I give you the recipe of this sweet, I will tell you a little story that comes along with it.

Subsequent to the revolution that begun in 1821 to liberate Greece from the Ottomans, followed the establishment of the first, free State of Greece, a very small country back then in 1830. In this entire venture, Greece had the support of the big protector countries of that time i.e. England, Russia, France, Austria and Italy. Passing by through several phases and forms of government, eventually the country ended up having constitutional monarchy, with its monarchs coming from Germany and Denmark. In 1974 and after 7 years of dictatorship, Greeks voted for the abolition of monarchy and the establishment of presidential parliamentary democracy.

Copenhagen.JPG

But going back to Copenhagen sweet, the story says that this dessert was created in honor of King George I of Greece. George I was born in Copenhagen and he was the second son of Christian IX King of Denmark. He ruled Greece between 1863 and 1913.

This sweet consists of layers of phylo and a rich almond filling in the middle with eggs and cognac. It was in fashion 50 years ago and my mother still contemplates it along with her youth. As we were talking the other time, she remembered it and it was she who gave me the idea of making it again. It is lighter than Baklava and fluffier because of the meringue. Everyone enjoyed it and it was a delicious and sweet trip back in time.

Copenhagen.JPG  

Copenhagen

Ingredients

12 phylo sheets (if the package contains odd number of phylo sheets you will divide in two and add one more on the bottom of the pan before the filling)

500 gr. almonds, chopped

160 gr. breadcrumbs

3 eggs, divided the yolks from the egg whites

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp cinnamon

1 cup sugar

3 tbsp cognac

Copenhagen.JPG  

For the Syrup

3 cups sugar

2 cups water

1 cinnamon stick

Juice of ½ lemon or 1 lime

  Copenhagen.JPG

Instructions

For the Filling

In your mixer put the egg yolks and the sugar and mix with the paddle until they become fluffy and pale.

In the meantime whisk the egg whites to become a stiff meringue.

In the egg yolk batter throw the almonds, the breadcrumbs, the baking powder, the cinnamon and the cognac and mix in slow speed until they are all incorporated.

Add the meringue and mix by hand slowly, slowly until it is incorporated as well.

Preheat oven to 175° C / 350° F.

Copenhagen.JPG

Take a deep, rectangular pan with dimensions 38 cm X 30 cm / 15 in. X 12 in.

Butter the pan.

Take a phylo sheet and lay it in the pan.

Butter it slightly or oil it with olive oil.

Put another phylo sheet over the first.

Butter it as well.

Copenhagen.JPG

Continue like this until you have laid half of the phylo sheets or half plus one if the number of phylos is odd.

Throw the filling and spread it to cover all the surface of the phylo.

On top of it follow the same procedure as before putting the rest of phylo sheets one by one buttering each one of them.

Cut the top phylo sheets in diamonds or squares.

Copenhagen.JPG

Be careful with the knife to not cut the bottom layers of phylo.

Put in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until the phylo takes a deep golden brown color.

Take it out of the oven.

Copenhagen.JPG  

For the Syrup

About 10 minutes before the Copenhagen is out of the oven put all the syrup ingredients in a pot and turn on your stove to high heat. Stir only until the sugar is dissolved. From then on stop stirring and let the syrup reach the temperature of about 100° to 110°.

Take the Copenhagen out of the oven and throw on top the hot syrup after having removed the cinnamon stick.
Let it cool and soak as much syrup as possible.

Copenhagen.JPG

4.9 from 7 reviews

Copenhagen
 
Author/ Συγγραφέας:
Recipe type/ Τύπος Πιάτου: Dessert
Cuisine/ Κουζίνα: Greek

Ingredients/ Συστατικά
  • 12 phylo sheets (if the package contains odd number of phylo sheets you will divide in two and add one more on the bottom of the pan before the filling)
  • 500 gr. almonds, chopped
  • 160 gr. breadcrumbs
  • 3 eggs, divided the yolks from the egg whites
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 tbsp cognac
For the Syrup
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Juice of ½ lemon or 1 lime

Instructions/ Εκτέλεση
For the Filling
  1. In your mixer put the egg yolks and the sugar and mix with the paddle until they become fluffy and pale.
  2. In the meantime whisk the egg whites to become a stiff meringue.
  3. In the egg yolk batter throw the almonds, the breadcrumbs, the baking powder, the cinnamon and the cognac and mix in slow speed until they are all incorporated.
  4. Add the meringue and mix by hand slowly, slowly until it is incorporated as well.
  5. Preheat oven to 175° C / 350° F.
  6. Take a deep, rectangular pan with dimensions 38 cm X 30 cm / 15 in. X 12 in.
  7. Butter the pan.
  8. Take a phylo sheet and lay it in the pan.
  9. Butter it slightly or oil it with olive oil.
  10. Put another phylo sheet over the first.
  11. Butter it as well.
  12. Continue like this until you have laid half of the phylo sheets or half plus one if the number of phylos is odd.
  13. Throw the filling and spread it to cover all the surface of the phylo.
  14. On top of it follow the same procedure as before putting the rest of phylo sheets one by one buttering each one of them.
  15. Cut the top phylo sheets in diamonds or squares.
  16. Be careful with the knife to not cut the bottom layers of phylo.
  17. Put in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until the phylo takes a deep golden brown color.
  18. Take it out of the oven.
For the Syrup
  1. About 10 minutes before the Copenhagen is out of the oven put all the syrup ingredients in a pot and turn on your stove to high heat.
  2. Stir only until the sugar is dissolved.
  3. From then on stop stirring and let the syrup reach the temperature of about 100° to 110°.
  4. Take the Copenhagen out of the oven and throw on top the hot syrup after having removed the cinnamon stick.
  5. Let it cool and soak as much syrup as possible.

Notes/ Σημειώσεις
Recipe adapted from several sources

4.9 from 7 reviews

Κοπενχάγη
 
Το ελληνικό γλυκό με το δανέζικο όνομα! Δημιουργήθηκε προς τιμήν του τότε βασιλιά Γεώργιου του Α΄ ο οποίος καταγόταν από την Κοπενχάγη και βασίλευσε στην Ελλάδα από το 1863 έως το 1913.
Author/ Συγγραφέας:
Recipe type/ Τύπος Πιάτου: Επιδόρπιο
Cuisine/ Κουζίνα: Ελληνική

Ingredients/ Συστατικά
  • 12 φύλλα κρούστας (αν το πακέτο περιέχει μονό αριθμό φύλλων μοιράστε τα στα δύο και προσθέστε ένα περισσότερο από κάτω)
  • 500 γρ. αμύγδαλα, ψιλοκομμένα
  • 160 γρ. φρυγανιά
  • 3 αυγά, χωριστά οι κρόκοι από τα ασπράδια
  • 2 κ.γ. μπέικιν πάουντερ
  • 1 κ.γ. κανέλα
  • 1 φλ. ζάχαρη
  • 3 κ.σ. κονιάκ
Για το Σιρόπι
  • 3 φλ. ζάχαρη
  • 2 φλ. νερό
  • 1 ξυλάκι κανέλα
  • Χυμό από ½ λεμόνι ή 1 λάιμ

Instructions/ Εκτέλεση
Για την Γέμιση
  1. Στο μίξερ σας βάλτε τους κρόκους των αυγών και τη ζάχαρη και χτυπήστε με το φτερό μέχρι να γίνουν αφράτα.
  2. Εν τω μεταξύ χτυπήστε τα ασπράδια να γίνουν σφιχτή μαρέγκα.
  3. Στο μίγμα κρόκων/ζάχαρης ρίξτε τα αμύγδαλα, τη φρυγανιά, το μπέικιν πάουντερ, την κανέλα και το κονιάκ και ανακατέψτε σε χαμηλή ταχύτητα μέχρι να ενσωματωθούν
  4. Ρίξτε τη μαρέγκα και ανακατέψτε με το χέρι σιγά-σιγά, μέχρι και αυτή να ενσωματωθεί στο μίγμα.
  5. Προθερμάνετε το φούρνο στους 175° C.
  6. Πάρτε ένα ορθογώνιο ταψί με διαστάσεις 38 cm X 30 cm.
  7. Βουτυρώστε το καλά.
  8. Πάρτε ένα φύλλο και απλώστε το στο ταψί.
  9. Βουτυρώστε το.
  10. Βάλτε από πάνω ένα άλλο φύλλο και βουτυρώστε ξανά.
  11. Συνεχίστε έτσι έως ότου χρησιμοποιήσετε τα μισά φύλλα ή τα μισά συν ένα αν ο αριθμός των φύλλων είναι μονός.
  12. Ρίξτε τη γέμιση και απλώστε τη να καλύψει όλη την επιφάνεια του φύλλου.
  13. Πάνω από τη γέμιση βάλτε και τα υπόλοιπα φύλλα βουτυρώνοντας το κάθε ένα.
  14. Κόψτε σε σχήμα διαμαντιών ή τετράγωνα.
  15. Προσέξτε όταν κόβετε να μην φτάνει το μαχαίρι στα κάτω κάτω φύλλα.
  16. Βάλτε στο φούρνο και ψήστε για 30 έως 35 λεπτά ή μέχρι το η επιφάνεια να πάρει ένα βαθύ χρυσό χρώμα.
  17. Βγάλτε από το φούρνο και αφήστε το να κρυώσει εντελώς.
Για το σιρόπι
  1. Σε μια βαθιά κατσαρόλα βάζουμε όλα τα υλικά του σιροπιού και τα βάζουμε να βράσουν.
  2. Βράστε για πέντε λεπτά και στη συνέχεια αφαιρέστε από τη φωτιά.
  3. Περιχύστε με το καυτό σιρόπι το κρύο γλυκό.
  4. Αφήστε το να μείνει μέχρι απορροφήσει το σιρόπι και είναι έτοιμο για σερβίρισμα.

Notes/ Σημειώσεις
Συνταγή προσαρμογή από διάφορες πηγές

Note: If you want to learn more on the Greco-Nordic relations and their influence in the Greek literature and architecture, you can go here!

42 Responses to Copenhagen

    1
  1. Hadia says:

    Thislooks so tasty, and I enjoyed reading the story behind this dessert.

  2. 2
  3. Julie says:

    I wish I had piece of this right now, it looks amazing.

  4. 3
  5. Jeannie says:

    This looks so yummy, just looking at it makes me drool!

  6. 4
  7. this looks divine. Perfect with a glass of milk or cup of tea. Thank you for sharing at the Thursday Favorite Things Blog Hop xo

  8. 5
  9. Amy Tong says:

    Your Copenhagen is gorgeous and perfect. What a wonderful pastry to enjoy for afternoon tea. :) Thank you for sharing this wonderful recipe.

  10. 6
  11. Miz Helen says:

    Hi Katerina,
    What a beautiful presentation for your Copenhagen pastry. This is such a delicate pastry and it looks delicious. Thank you so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday and have a great week!
    Miz Helen

  12. 7
  13. Diane Balch says:

    I’ve eaten this before but I did not know the name nor the history around it. Thank you so much for sharing it with us on foodie friday.

  14. 8
  15. Totally loving this baklava. You made it look so delish and easy, my friend :)

  16. 9
  17. G’day Katerina, this looks lovely, true!
    I just finished brekkie, but could go for one of these now; viewing as part of Foodie Friends Friday Party!
    Cheers! Joanne
    http://www.facebook.com/whatsonthelist

  18. 10
  19. Susan says:

    I think I would really enjoy this lighter version of baklava, Katerina! I do love baklava but it is rich. Thanks for another informative history lesson!

  20. 11
  21. grace says:

    i thought baklava was the end-all-be-all of desserts, but this might give it a run for its money! thanks for educating me about this delicious dessert!

  22. 12
  23. TaMara says:

    This looks divine! I love that you shared the background to the goodie. I’d love for you to share this at Food on Friday at Tales of a Pee Dee Mama.

  24. 13
  25. If you didn’t say these are copenhagen, I would take them as Baklava…thanks for the history behind this divine treat. They look really delicious and I bet it’s addictive!

  26. 14
  27. Barbara says:

    Thanks for the history behind the recipe, Katerina! I love posts like this. Must say, after reading the recipe, I think I’d like this way more than the traditional baklava recipe.

  28. 15
  29. Funnily enough, when I saw the photo I thought Baklava – I’ve never heard of Copenhagen as a sweet/dessert so it is so nice to become acquainted with it. Thanks for the little nugget of history too :-)

  30. 16
  31. gloria says:

    Katerina this look perfect and delicious!:)

  32. 17
  33. What a gorgeous dessert~I would love this with a cup of coffee:) Your pictures showing the steps to make this wonderful dessert are always beautiful~ Love the history behind this too~ Lynn @ Turnips 2 Tangerines

  34. 18
  35. Louise says:

    A lovely and delectable dessert Katerina. It truly amazes me how culture and food coexist in the essence of the past. Please thank your mom for sharing her memories and recipe.

    Thank you so much for sharing…

  36. 19
  37. Joanne says:

    Baklava with fewer layers?? This definitely sounds like something I need in my life!

  38. 20
  39. Kathy says:

    Katerina, This looks fabulous! Such an interesting post…nice to learn something new. My son and his family are in Greece this week on vacation. They are loving your beautiful country. Last time I spoke to him they were in Santorini.

  40. 21
  41. rosita says:

    Se ve muy esponjoso me gustaría probar este postre tradicional,hugs,hugs.

  42. 22
  43. such a wonderfully delicious dessert – I would eat the whole pan of it! such a lovely post!

  44. 23
  45. My mouth is watering right now watching these pictures, rich & heavenly dessert. Wonderful presentation too!

  46. 24
  47. thanks for you lovely comments, you have an adorable blog with just the right bite into rich Greek history laced into your delicious treats
    HAVE A GREAT DAY!!!

  48. 25
  49. Juliana says:

    I love the story behind the sweet….and the step by step pictures are just awesome Katerina. I would love to have a piece or too with tea.
    Hope you are having a fabulous week :D

  50. 26
  51. Liz says:

    Oh, my mouth is watering! I adore baklava and know I’d love these Copenhagens, too. Beautifully done!

  52. 27
  53. Nadji says:

    Une pâtisserie que je dégusterai avec plaisir.
    Recette notée.
    A bientôt

  54. 28
  55. Gourmantine says:

    When I first saw the photo, I thought “oh, how wonderful, a baklava”, but copenhagen sounds equally delicious!

  56. 29
  57. Asmita says:

    Your pictures are making me drool!

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  59. Your Copenhagen dessert looks irresistible.

  60. 31
  61. I have heard of this sweet Katerina mou, but have not seen a picture and could not imagine it. Thank you so much for the history and the beautiful pictures!! ♥♥♥

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  63. oh yummm, diamonds look so gooey & syrupy ,can tempt even those who are not fond of sweets, hahaha… what a coincidence over the name…have had baklava as bars, rolls and cigars but your dish tops the list :-)

  64. 33
  65. WoW!! I really want to try this dessert. Thanks for sharing with Simple Supper Tuesday.

  66. 34
  67. This Looks yummy. It was interesting to read about the history of the dessert!

  68. 35
  69. Beth says:

    This dessert sounds delicious! And once again, I’m enjoying the Greek history lessons you’re giving us.

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  71. Kate says:

    What a sweet story to go with a sweet!

  72. 37
  73. Sissi says:

    Katerina, it does look more delicious than baklava which is usually to heavy and too sweet for me. And from your description I can imagine it softer and lighter… My husband would love it (he is the biggest fan of almonds at home). Thank you for sharing the story behind this dessert. I must try it one day. It doesn’t look as scary as some phyllo pastries.

  74. 38
  75. Marina Parmigiani says:

    Very interesting! The recipe must be sooooo good!

  76. 39
  77. pepi says:

    Πολύ μ’ αρέσει η Κοπενχάγη!!!!
    Και η πόλη αλλά και το γλυκάκι σου!!!!

  78. 40
  79. Debra says:

    Who knew? This sounds delicious and I love the history lesson.

  80. 41
  81. Πολύ κομψό και φίνο γλυκάκι!
    Καλή εβδομάδα Κατερίνα μου!

  82. 42
  83. Ola says:

    Perfect, I would love the whole plate:)
    Blog about life and travelling
    Blog about cooking

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